Eggs are a wonder food. They are a cheap source of high-quality protein, contain important vitamins and minerals, and have a favorable impact on blood cholesterol when consumed in moderation. Eggs are very affordable and can be prepared in so many ways. Since eggs are such an excellent source of high-quality protein and other nutrients, they can be included as part of a healthy diet in most circumstances.

As with anything, however, there are pros and cons to eating eggs. They aren’t perfectly healthy, but they certainly don’t deserve the bad reputation that has followed them for the past few decades. Eggs have been linked to elevated LDL cholesterol (the “bad” kind) and increased risk of heart disease and stroke. This has led to recommendations from leading experts that we eat fewer eggs if we want to lower our risk for these diseases.

Fortunately, newer research has shown that these conclusions may not be correct after all. Let’s explore some benefits of eggs to your health:

They Help Your ‘Good’ Cholesterol

Eggs are rich in cholesterol, but they are largely composed of the “good” HDL cholesterol that is believed to protect against heart disease. When you eat cholesterol, your body produces less of it.

This is why many people who follow low-cholesterol diets still have high cholesterol. While cholesterol in food is not as important as we once believed, we do need cholesterol in our bodies to produce hormones and build cell membranes.

Eggs have the highest cholesterol content of all foods, but research suggests that eating one egg a day does not increase heart disease risk in healthy people.

Low Triglycerides With Them

Triglycerides are a type of blood fat. High levels of triglycerides are linked with an increased risk for heart disease and diabetes. Eggs are a source of healthy fats that can help lower triglyceride levels.

A study on healthy people showed that consuming one egg every day for six weeks did not increase blood triglycerides. People who regularly consumed eggs had lower triglyceride levels than those who did not.

They Can Lower Your Stroke Risk

Evidence suggests that people who regularly eat eggs have a lower risk for stroke. In one study, researchers examined data from more than 90,000 people aged 35–80 and found that those who ate more eggs had a lower risk of stroke compared to people who ate fewer eggs. Eating two eggs per week was linked with a reduced risk of stroke while eating seven eggs per week was not.

Experts believe that eggs have a positive impact on stroke risk because they are a good source of choline, a nutrient that helps break down the molecules in the blood that can lead to stroke.

It’s a nutrient-dense food

Eggs are one of the most nutrient-dense foods on the planet. They are packed with vitamins, minerals, and powerful antioxidants. A large egg has about 78 calories and 6 grams of protein. It also has 1.5 grams of saturated fat, no cholesterol, and vitamins A and B2.

Eggs are also a good source of minerals like selenium, zinc, iron, and magnesium. Researchers estimate that if people ate more eggs as part of a healthy diet, they could reduce their risk of heart disease by 15–20%.

A complete protein is offered by them

Protein is an essential nutrient. It’s necessary for growth and repair, and it’s present in every cell in the body. Animal-based foods, like eggs, are rich in protein and health-promoting nutrients. Plant-based foods, like legumes and grains, also contain protein, but they do not contain all of the essential amino acids needed to build healthy bodies.

Eggs are a complete protein source, meaning they contain all of the essential amino acids. Eggs have one of the highest amounts of protein per calorie of any food.

They Help With Portion Control

Eating just one egg for breakfast is a great way to stay full until lunchtime. It’s a low-cost and nutritious way to control portions and stay full and satisfied until your next meal. One egg has only 78 calories and 6 grams of protein, and it’s also a good source of minerals like selenium, zinc, iron, and magnesium.

Plus, it contains no cholesterol.

They’re Low-Cost

Eggs are one of the cheapest sources of high-quality protein. According to the USDA, more than 50% of the cost of raising chickens is due to feed and feed additives. About 62% of the cost of eggs is due to feed and feed additives.

So, while eggs may be a bit more expensive than some other sources of protein, their cost is low compared to the cost of raising chickens and other livestock.

They’re Heart Healthy

Eggs are good for your heart for several reasons. They’re a great source of choline, which helps break down the molecules in the blood that can lead to stroke. They’re packed with antioxidants that fight against oxidative stress. Oxidative stress has been linked to several chronic diseases, including heart disease and diabetes.

In addition, eggs have been shown to reduce blood cholesterol, which can protect against heart disease. And finally, they are a great source of soluble fiber, which has been shown to lower blood cholesterol levels.

They Are Good for Your Eyes

Lutein and zeaxanthin, powerful antioxidants found in eggs, may help prevent age-related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is the leading cause of blindness among older adults in the United States.

People who eat two or more eggs per week have up to a 19% lower risk of developing AMD compared to people who eat fewer eggs. Lutein and zeaxanthin may also help reduce the risk of developing cataracts. Eating two or more eggs per week has been linked to a 24% lower risk of cataracts.

They Help Sharpen the Brain

Eating more eggs may help keep your brain sharp and ward off cognitive decline as you grow older. A few studies have found that people who eat two or more eggs per week have a lower risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia compared to people who eat fewer eggs. This may be because eggs are a great source of choline and other important nutrients for brain health.

They are also a good source of iron, which helps keep red blood cells healthy, and folate, which is important for growing new neurons. Eating one or two eggs a day can be part of a healthy diet for most people, as long as you are mindful of your total cholesterol intake. People who are at risk for heart disease or have high cholesterol may want to consider limiting their egg intake.

Conclusion

Eggs should be a part of a healthy diet for most people, as long as you are mindful of your total cholesterol intake. People who are at risk for heart disease or have high cholesterol may want to consider limiting their egg intake. For most people, eggs are an affordable and nutritious source of protein. They also provide key vitamins and minerals, and they are low in calories and fat.

Eating one egg a day is a great way to add more high-quality protein to your diet and stay full until your next meal. It’s also a good way to get the vitamins and minerals you need to stay healthy.

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